Coronary Angiography -Indications of Coronary Arteriography (Angiography)

 

Coronary Arteriography (Angiography)

  • Radio-opaque dye is injected into a peripheral artery and coronary arteries are visualized for any obstruc­tive atherosclerotic lesions.
  • cardiac catheterization was primarily a diagnostic procedure that was used to evaluate ventricular function, and coronary anatomy hemodynamics,.
  • diagnostic catheterization and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are done by skin puncture ,under local anesthesia,

Coronary Angiogrpahy 1

Coronary Arteriography (Angiography)

 

MAJOR COMPLICATIONS —

 

  • The risk of producing a major complication (death, myocardial infarction, or major embolization)
  • potentially fatal or lifestyle-limiting cardiac disease
  • the risk-to-benefit ratio still favors performing this procedure
  • The death during diagnostic cardiac catheterization is generally well below 1 percent.

Coronary Angiogrpahy 2

Coronary Arteriography (Angiography)

 

Indications of Coronary Angiogrpahy :

  • Severe symptoms despite optimal medical therapy.
  • intracardiac tumor, mass or thrombus (6 to 8 percent each),
  • native valvular disease, aortic dissection or aneurysm,
  • and congenital heart disease (4 percent)
  • r cardiac sources of embolism (36 percent),
  • endocarditis (14 percent), prosthetic heart valve function (12 percent),
  • Patients for PC! (percutaneous coronary inter­vention) or CABG (Coronary artery bypass sur­gery)
  • Diagnostic test for troublesome symptoms Patients with CAD who have been resuscitated. Signs of severe ischemia on noninvasive test­ing.
  • Aortic Stenosis or HOCM -hypertrophic obstruc­tive cardiomyopathy with angina to rule out cause, or before valve replacement in AS
  • High-risk patients after acute MI
  • Other causes of Myocardial Ischemia, suspeCted Kawasaki or coronary artery anomaly.