Article Contents ::

Details About Generic Salt ::  Colchici

Main Medicine Class:: Analgesic, Gout   

(KOHL-chih-seen)
Colchicine
Tablets: 0.6 mg
Injection: 0.5 mg/mL
Class: Analgesic, Gout

 

 Action Inhibits inflammation and reduces pain and swelling associated with gouty arthritis.

 

 Indications Treatment and relief of pain in attacks of acute gouty arthritis; regular prophylaxis between attacks and is often effective in aborting an attack when taken at the first sign of articular discomfort; colchicine IV is used when rapid response is desired or if GI side effects interefere with oral use. Familial Mediterranean fever; hepatic cirrhosis; primary biliary cirrhosis; treatment of Behcet disease; scleroderma; Sweet syndrome

 

 Contraindications Serious GI, renal, hepatic, or cardiac disorders; blood dyscrasias.

 

 Route/Dosage

Acute Gouty Arthritis

Adults: Initial dose (give at first sign of attack) PO 1.2 mg; then 0.6 q hr or 1.2 mg q 2 hr until pain is relieved or diarrhea ensues. Total dose is usually 4 to 8 mg. Wait 3 days before initiating a second course of therapy. IV Initial dose 2 mg; then 0.5 mg q 6 hr until satisfactory response is achieved (max, 4 mg/24 hr or 1 course of treatment).

Prophylaxis

Adults: PO 0.6 mg/day for 3 to 4 days/wk if fewer than 1 attack/yr; if more than 1 attack/yr, 0.6 mg/day. Severe cases may require 1.2 to 1.8 mg/day.

Prophylaxis or Maintenance of Recurrent or Chronic Gouty Arthritis

Adults: IV 0.5 to 1 mg 1 or 2 times/day; however, oral form is preferable, usually in conjunction with a uricosuric agent.

Surgical Patients

Adults: PO 0.6 mg tid for 3 days before and 3 days after surgery.

 

 Interactions None well documented.

Do not dilute with 5% Dextrose in water.

 

 Lab Test Interferences May cause false-positive results in urine tests for RBCs and hemoglobin.

 

 Adverse Reactions

DERMATOLOGIC: Dermatoses; purpura; alopecia. GI: Nausea; vomiting; diarrhea; abdominal pain. HEMATOLOGIC: Bone marrow depression with aplastic anemia; agranulocytosis, leukopenia or thrombocytopenia (long-term therapy). HEPATIC: Elevated alkaline phosphatase and AST. OTHER: Reversible azoospermia; myopathy; peripheral neuritis.

 

 Precautions

Pregnancy: Category C (oral). Category D (parenteral). Lactation: Undetermined. CHILDREN: Safety and efficacy not established. Elderly: Administer with great caution to elderly and debilitated patients. Hepatic function impairment: Increased colchicine toxicity may occur. GI effects: Drug may cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain that may aggravate pre-existing peptic ulcer or spastic colon. Discontinue drug if these symptoms appear. Injection: Severe local irritation occurs if drug is given by SC or IM route. Myopathy and neuropathy: Myoneuropathy may occur and cause weakness in patients with impaired kidney function; serum creatine kinase may be elevated. Usually resolves in 3 to 4 wk after drug withdrawal. Vitamin B12 malabsorption: Colchicine induces reversible malabsorption of vitamin B12 with long-term use.

PATIENT CARE CONSIDERATIONS


 

 Administration/Storage

Parenteral

  • Reconstitute with 0.9% Sodium Chloride (without preservatives) only.
  • Administer parenterally via IV route only. Considerable irritation and tissue damage may occur if leakage into surrounding tissue occurs.

Oral

  • Store tablets in airtight, light-resistant container.

 

 Assessment/Interventions

  • Obtain patient history, including drug history and any known allergies.
  • Monitor serum uric acid and creatinine throughout therapy.
  • Check blood counts periodically in patients undergoing long-term therapy.
  • Monitor for phlebitis and extravasation.
  • Assess for signs of toxicity (eg, abdominal pain, alopecia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, myopathy, peripheral neuritis). Notify health care provider immediately if these signs occur.
  • Assess for signs of vitamin B12 deficiency (eg, anemia, paresis of extremities).
OVERDOSAGE: SIGNS & SYMPTOMS
  Nausea, severe abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, shock, ST segment elevation, paralysis, respiratory failure, liver damage, renal failure, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, alopecia, stomatitis

 

 Patient/Family Education

  • Instruct patient to take colchicine regularly to prevent acute attacks.
  • Instruct patient not to exceed 8 mg in course of therapy for acute attack. To minimize cumulative toxicity, patient should wait 3 days before starting second course.
  • Advise patient with gout to drink at least 2000 mL of fluid daily, unless contraindicated.
  • Reinforce health care provider’s instructions about weight loss, diet, and alcohol intake.
  • Advise patient to have extra supply of drug on hand in case health care provider gives instructions to increase dosage.
  • Instruct patient to stop taking drug if nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or abdominal pain occurs, especially if patient has history of spastic colon or ulcers.

 

Drugs Class ::

(KOHL-chih-seen)
Colchicine
Tablets: 0.6 mg
Injection: 0.5 mg/mL
Class: Analgesic, Gout

 

 Action Inhibits inflammation and reduces pain and swelling associated with gouty arthritis.

 

 Indications Treatment and relief of pain in attacks of acute gouty arthritis; regular prophylaxis between attacks and is often effective in aborting an attack when taken at the first sign of articular discomfort; colchicine IV is used when rapid response is desired or if GI side effects interefere with oral use. Familial Mediterranean fever; hepatic cirrhosis; primary biliary cirrhosis; treatment of Behcet disease; scleroderma; Sweet syndrome

 

 Contraindications Serious GI, renal, hepatic, or cardiac disorders; blood dyscrasias.

 

 Route/Dosage

Acute Gouty Arthritis

Adults: Initial dose (give at first sign of attack) PO 1.2 mg; then 0.6 q hr or 1.2 mg q 2 hr until pain is relieved or diarrhea ensues. Total dose is usually 4 to 8 mg. Wait 3 days before initiating a second course of therapy. IV Initial dose 2 mg; then 0.5 mg q 6 hr until satisfactory response is achieved (max, 4 mg/24 hr or 1 course of treatment).

Prophylaxis

Adults: PO 0.6 mg/day for 3 to 4 days/wk if fewer than 1 attack/yr; if more than 1 attack/yr, 0.6 mg/day. Severe cases may require 1.2 to 1.8 mg/day.

Prophylaxis or Maintenance of Recurrent or Chronic Gouty Arthritis

Adults: IV 0.5 to 1 mg 1 or 2 times/day; however, oral form is preferable, usually in conjunction with a uricosuric agent.

Surgical Patients

Adults: PO 0.6 mg tid for 3 days before and 3 days after surgery.

 

 Interactions None well documented.

Do not dilute with 5% Dextrose in water.

 

 Lab Test Interferences May cause false-positive results in urine tests for RBCs and hemoglobin.

 

 Adverse Reactions

DERMATOLOGIC: Dermatoses; purpura; alopecia. GI: Nausea; vomiting; diarrhea; abdominal pain. HEMATOLOGIC: Bone marrow depression with aplastic anemia; agranulocytosis, leukopenia or thrombocytopenia (long-term therapy). HEPATIC: Elevated alkaline phosphatase and AST. OTHER: Reversible azoospermia; myopathy; peripheral neuritis.

 

 Precautions

Pregnancy: Category C (oral). Category D (parenteral). Lactation: Undetermined. CHILDREN: Safety and efficacy not established. Elderly: Administer with great caution to elderly and debilitated patients. Hepatic function impairment: Increased colchicine toxicity may occur. GI effects: Drug may cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain that may aggravate pre-existing peptic ulcer or spastic colon. Discontinue drug if these symptoms appear. Injection: Severe local irritation occurs if drug is given by SC or IM route. Myopathy and neuropathy: Myoneuropathy may occur and cause weakness in patients with impaired kidney function; serum creatine kinase may be elevated. Usually resolves in 3 to 4 wk after drug withdrawal. Vitamin B12 malabsorption: Colchicine induces reversible malabsorption of vitamin B12 with long-term use.

PATIENT CARE CONSIDERATIONS


 

 Administration/Storage

Parenteral

  • Reconstitute with 0.9% Sodium Chloride (without preservatives) only.
  • Administer parenterally via IV route only. Considerable irritation and tissue damage may occur if leakage into surrounding tissue occurs.

Oral

  • Store tablets in airtight, light-resistant container.

 

 Assessment/Interventions

  • Obtain patient history, including drug history and any known allergies.
  • Monitor serum uric acid and creatinine throughout therapy.
  • Check blood counts periodically in patients undergoing long-term therapy.
  • Monitor for phlebitis and extravasation.
  • Assess for signs of toxicity (eg, abdominal pain, alopecia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, myopathy, peripheral neuritis). Notify health care provider immediately if these signs occur.
  • Assess for signs of vitamin B12 deficiency (eg, anemia, paresis of extremities).
OVERDOSAGE: SIGNS & SYMPTOMS
  Nausea, severe abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, shock, ST segment elevation, paralysis, respiratory failure, liver damage, renal failure, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, alopecia, stomatitis

 

 Patient/Family Education

  • Instruct patient to take colchicine regularly to prevent acute attacks.
  • Instruct patient not to exceed 8 mg in course of therapy for acute attack. To minimize cumulative toxicity, patient should wait 3 days before starting second course.
  • Advise patient with gout to drink at least 2000 mL of fluid daily, unless contraindicated.
  • Reinforce health care provider’s instructions about weight loss, diet, and alcohol intake.
  • Advise patient to have extra supply of drug on hand in case health care provider gives instructions to increase dosage.
  • Instruct patient to stop taking drug if nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or abdominal pain occurs, especially if patient has history of spastic colon or ulcers.

Indications for Drugs ::

(KOHL-chih-seen)
Colchicine
Tablets: 0.6 mg
Injection: 0.5 mg/mL
Class: Analgesic, Gout

 

 Action Inhibits inflammation and reduces pain and swelling associated with gouty arthritis.

 

 Indications Treatment and relief of pain in attacks of acute gouty arthritis; regular prophylaxis between attacks and is often effective in aborting an attack when taken at the first sign of articular discomfort; colchicine IV is used when rapid response is desired or if GI side effects interefere with oral use. Familial Mediterranean fever; hepatic cirrhosis; primary biliary cirrhosis; treatment of Behcet disease; scleroderma; Sweet syndrome

 

 Contraindications Serious GI, renal, hepatic, or cardiac disorders; blood dyscrasias.

 

 Route/Dosage

Acute Gouty Arthritis

Adults: Initial dose (give at first sign of attack) PO 1.2 mg; then 0.6 q hr or 1.2 mg q 2 hr until pain is relieved or diarrhea ensues. Total dose is usually 4 to 8 mg. Wait 3 days before initiating a second course of therapy. IV Initial dose 2 mg; then 0.5 mg q 6 hr until satisfactory response is achieved (max, 4 mg/24 hr or 1 course of treatment).

Prophylaxis

Adults: PO 0.6 mg/day for 3 to 4 days/wk if fewer than 1 attack/yr; if more than 1 attack/yr, 0.6 mg/day. Severe cases may require 1.2 to 1.8 mg/day.

Prophylaxis or Maintenance of Recurrent or Chronic Gouty Arthritis

Adults: IV 0.5 to 1 mg 1 or 2 times/day; however, oral form is preferable, usually in conjunction with a uricosuric agent.

Surgical Patients

Adults: PO 0.6 mg tid for 3 days before and 3 days after surgery.

 

 Interactions None well documented.

Do not dilute with 5% Dextrose in water.

 

 Lab Test Interferences May cause false-positive results in urine tests for RBCs and hemoglobin.

 

 Adverse Reactions

DERMATOLOGIC: Dermatoses; purpura; alopecia. GI: Nausea; vomiting; diarrhea; abdominal pain. HEMATOLOGIC: Bone marrow depression with aplastic anemia; agranulocytosis, leukopenia or thrombocytopenia (long-term therapy). HEPATIC: Elevated alkaline phosphatase and AST. OTHER: Reversible azoospermia; myopathy; peripheral neuritis.

 

 Precautions

Pregnancy: Category C (oral). Category D (parenteral). Lactation: Undetermined. CHILDREN: Safety and efficacy not established. Elderly: Administer with great caution to elderly and debilitated patients. Hepatic function impairment: Increased colchicine toxicity may occur. GI effects: Drug may cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain that may aggravate pre-existing peptic ulcer or spastic colon. Discontinue drug if these symptoms appear. Injection: Severe local irritation occurs if drug is given by SC or IM route. Myopathy and neuropathy: Myoneuropathy may occur and cause weakness in patients with impaired kidney function; serum creatine kinase may be elevated. Usually resolves in 3 to 4 wk after drug withdrawal. Vitamin B12 malabsorption: Colchicine induces reversible malabsorption of vitamin B12 with long-term use.

PATIENT CARE CONSIDERATIONS


 

 Administration/Storage

Parenteral

  • Reconstitute with 0.9% Sodium Chloride (without preservatives) only.
  • Administer parenterally via IV route only. Considerable irritation and tissue damage may occur if leakage into surrounding tissue occurs.

Oral

  • Store tablets in airtight, light-resistant container.

 

 Assessment/Interventions

  • Obtain patient history, including drug history and any known allergies.
  • Monitor serum uric acid and creatinine throughout therapy.
  • Check blood counts periodically in patients undergoing long-term therapy.
  • Monitor for phlebitis and extravasation.
  • Assess for signs of toxicity (eg, abdominal pain, alopecia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, myopathy, peripheral neuritis). Notify health care provider immediately if these signs occur.
  • Assess for signs of vitamin B12 deficiency (eg, anemia, paresis of extremities).
OVERDOSAGE: SIGNS & SYMPTOMS
  Nausea, severe abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, shock, ST segment elevation, paralysis, respiratory failure, liver damage, renal failure, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, alopecia, stomatitis

 

 Patient/Family Education

  • Instruct patient to take colchicine regularly to prevent acute attacks.
  • Instruct patient not to exceed 8 mg in course of therapy for acute attack. To minimize cumulative toxicity, patient should wait 3 days before starting second course.
  • Advise patient with gout to drink at least 2000 mL of fluid daily, unless contraindicated.
  • Reinforce health care provider’s instructions about weight loss, diet, and alcohol intake.
  • Advise patient to have extra supply of drug on hand in case health care provider gives instructions to increase dosage.
  • Instruct patient to stop taking drug if nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or abdominal pain occurs, especially if patient has history of spastic colon or ulcers.

Drug Dose ::

(KOHL-chih-seen)
Colchicine
Tablets: 0.6 mg
Injection: 0.5 mg/mL
Class: Analgesic, Gout

 

 Action Inhibits inflammation and reduces pain and swelling associated with gouty arthritis.

 

 Indications Treatment and relief of pain in attacks of acute gouty arthritis; regular prophylaxis between attacks and is often effective in aborting an attack when taken at the first sign of articular discomfort; colchicine IV is used when rapid response is desired or if GI side effects interefere with oral use. Familial Mediterranean fever; hepatic cirrhosis; primary biliary cirrhosis; treatment of Behcet disease; scleroderma; Sweet syndrome

 

 Contraindications Serious GI, renal, hepatic, or cardiac disorders; blood dyscrasias.

 

 Route/Dosage

Acute Gouty Arthritis

Adults: Initial dose (give at first sign of attack) PO 1.2 mg; then 0.6 q hr or 1.2 mg q 2 hr until pain is relieved or diarrhea ensues. Total dose is usually 4 to 8 mg. Wait 3 days before initiating a second course of therapy. IV Initial dose 2 mg; then 0.5 mg q 6 hr until satisfactory response is achieved (max, 4 mg/24 hr or 1 course of treatment).

Prophylaxis

Adults: PO 0.6 mg/day for 3 to 4 days/wk if fewer than 1 attack/yr; if more than 1 attack/yr, 0.6 mg/day. Severe cases may require 1.2 to 1.8 mg/day.

Prophylaxis or Maintenance of Recurrent or Chronic Gouty Arthritis

Adults: IV 0.5 to 1 mg 1 or 2 times/day; however, oral form is preferable, usually in conjunction with a uricosuric agent.

Surgical Patients

Adults: PO 0.6 mg tid for 3 days before and 3 days after surgery.

 

 Interactions None well documented.

Do not dilute with 5% Dextrose in water.

 

 Lab Test Interferences May cause false-positive results in urine tests for RBCs and hemoglobin.

 

 Adverse Reactions

DERMATOLOGIC: Dermatoses; purpura; alopecia. GI: Nausea; vomiting; diarrhea; abdominal pain. HEMATOLOGIC: Bone marrow depression with aplastic anemia; agranulocytosis, leukopenia or thrombocytopenia (long-term therapy). HEPATIC: Elevated alkaline phosphatase and AST. OTHER: Reversible azoospermia; myopathy; peripheral neuritis.

 

 Precautions

Pregnancy: Category C (oral). Category D (parenteral). Lactation: Undetermined. CHILDREN: Safety and efficacy not established. Elderly: Administer with great caution to elderly and debilitated patients. Hepatic function impairment: Increased colchicine toxicity may occur. GI effects: Drug may cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain that may aggravate pre-existing peptic ulcer or spastic colon. Discontinue drug if these symptoms appear. Injection: Severe local irritation occurs if drug is given by SC or IM route. Myopathy and neuropathy: Myoneuropathy may occur and cause weakness in patients with impaired kidney function; serum creatine kinase may be elevated. Usually resolves in 3 to 4 wk after drug withdrawal. Vitamin B12 malabsorption: Colchicine induces reversible malabsorption of vitamin B12 with long-term use.

PATIENT CARE CONSIDERATIONS


 

 Administration/Storage

Parenteral

  • Reconstitute with 0.9% Sodium Chloride (without preservatives) only.
  • Administer parenterally via IV route only. Considerable irritation and tissue damage may occur if leakage into surrounding tissue occurs.

Oral

  • Store tablets in airtight, light-resistant container.

 

 Assessment/Interventions

  • Obtain patient history, including drug history and any known allergies.
  • Monitor serum uric acid and creatinine throughout therapy.
  • Check blood counts periodically in patients undergoing long-term therapy.
  • Monitor for phlebitis and extravasation.
  • Assess for signs of toxicity (eg, abdominal pain, alopecia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, myopathy, peripheral neuritis). Notify health care provider immediately if these signs occur.
  • Assess for signs of vitamin B12 deficiency (eg, anemia, paresis of extremities).
OVERDOSAGE: SIGNS & SYMPTOMS
  Nausea, severe abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, shock, ST segment elevation, paralysis, respiratory failure, liver damage, renal failure, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, alopecia, stomatitis

 

 Patient/Family Education

  • Instruct patient to take colchicine regularly to prevent acute attacks.
  • Instruct patient not to exceed 8 mg in course of therapy for acute attack. To minimize cumulative toxicity, patient should wait 3 days before starting second course.
  • Advise patient with gout to drink at least 2000 mL of fluid daily, unless contraindicated.
  • Reinforce health care provider’s instructions about weight loss, diet, and alcohol intake.
  • Advise patient to have extra supply of drug on hand in case health care provider gives instructions to increase dosage.
  • Instruct patient to stop taking drug if nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or abdominal pain occurs, especially if patient has history of spastic colon or ulcers.

Contraindication ::

(KOHL-chih-seen)
Colchicine
Tablets: 0.6 mg
Injection: 0.5 mg/mL
Class: Analgesic, Gout

 

 Action Inhibits inflammation and reduces pain and swelling associated with gouty arthritis.

 

 Indications Treatment and relief of pain in attacks of acute gouty arthritis; regular prophylaxis between attacks and is often effective in aborting an attack when taken at the first sign of articular discomfort; colchicine IV is used when rapid response is desired or if GI side effects interefere with oral use. Familial Mediterranean fever; hepatic cirrhosis; primary biliary cirrhosis; treatment of Behcet disease; scleroderma; Sweet syndrome

 

 Contraindications Serious GI, renal, hepatic, or cardiac disorders; blood dyscrasias.

 

 Route/Dosage

Acute Gouty Arthritis

Adults: Initial dose (give at first sign of attack) PO 1.2 mg; then 0.6 q hr or 1.2 mg q 2 hr until pain is relieved or diarrhea ensues. Total dose is usually 4 to 8 mg. Wait 3 days before initiating a second course of therapy. IV Initial dose 2 mg; then 0.5 mg q 6 hr until satisfactory response is achieved (max, 4 mg/24 hr or 1 course of treatment).

Prophylaxis

Adults: PO 0.6 mg/day for 3 to 4 days/wk if fewer than 1 attack/yr; if more than 1 attack/yr, 0.6 mg/day. Severe cases may require 1.2 to 1.8 mg/day.

Prophylaxis or Maintenance of Recurrent or Chronic Gouty Arthritis

Adults: IV 0.5 to 1 mg 1 or 2 times/day; however, oral form is preferable, usually in conjunction with a uricosuric agent.

Surgical Patients

Adults: PO 0.6 mg tid for 3 days before and 3 days after surgery.

 

 Interactions None well documented.

Do not dilute with 5% Dextrose in water.

 

 Lab Test Interferences May cause false-positive results in urine tests for RBCs and hemoglobin.

 

 Adverse Reactions

DERMATOLOGIC: Dermatoses; purpura; alopecia. GI: Nausea; vomiting; diarrhea; abdominal pain. HEMATOLOGIC: Bone marrow depression with aplastic anemia; agranulocytosis, leukopenia or thrombocytopenia (long-term therapy). HEPATIC: Elevated alkaline phosphatase and AST. OTHER: Reversible azoospermia; myopathy; peripheral neuritis.

 

 Precautions

Pregnancy: Category C (oral). Category D (parenteral). Lactation: Undetermined. CHILDREN: Safety and efficacy not established. Elderly: Administer with great caution to elderly and debilitated patients. Hepatic function impairment: Increased colchicine toxicity may occur. GI effects: Drug may cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain that may aggravate pre-existing peptic ulcer or spastic colon. Discontinue drug if these symptoms appear. Injection: Severe local irritation occurs if drug is given by SC or IM route. Myopathy and neuropathy: Myoneuropathy may occur and cause weakness in patients with impaired kidney function; serum creatine kinase may be elevated. Usually resolves in 3 to 4 wk after drug withdrawal. Vitamin B12 malabsorption: Colchicine induces reversible malabsorption of vitamin B12 with long-term use.

PATIENT CARE CONSIDERATIONS


 

 Administration/Storage

Parenteral

  • Reconstitute with 0.9% Sodium Chloride (without preservatives) only.
  • Administer parenterally via IV route only. Considerable irritation and tissue damage may occur if leakage into surrounding tissue occurs.

Oral

  • Store tablets in airtight, light-resistant container.

 

 Assessment/Interventions

  • Obtain patient history, including drug history and any known allergies.
  • Monitor serum uric acid and creatinine throughout therapy.
  • Check blood counts periodically in patients undergoing long-term therapy.
  • Monitor for phlebitis and extravasation.
  • Assess for signs of toxicity (eg, abdominal pain, alopecia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, myopathy, peripheral neuritis). Notify health care provider immediately if these signs occur.
  • Assess for signs of vitamin B12 deficiency (eg, anemia, paresis of extremities).
OVERDOSAGE: SIGNS & SYMPTOMS
  Nausea, severe abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, shock, ST segment elevation, paralysis, respiratory failure, liver damage, renal failure, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, alopecia, stomatitis

 

 Patient/Family Education

  • Instruct patient to take colchicine regularly to prevent acute attacks.
  • Instruct patient not to exceed 8 mg in course of therapy for acute attack. To minimize cumulative toxicity, patient should wait 3 days before starting second course.
  • Advise patient with gout to drink at least 2000 mL of fluid daily, unless contraindicated.
  • Reinforce health care provider’s instructions about weight loss, diet, and alcohol intake.
  • Advise patient to have extra supply of drug on hand in case health care provider gives instructions to increase dosage.
  • Instruct patient to stop taking drug if nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or abdominal pain occurs, especially if patient has history of spastic colon or ulcers.

Drug Precautions ::

(KOHL-chih-seen)
Colchicine
Tablets: 0.6 mg
Injection: 0.5 mg/mL
Class: Analgesic, Gout

 

 Action Inhibits inflammation and reduces pain and swelling associated with gouty arthritis.

 

 Indications Treatment and relief of pain in attacks of acute gouty arthritis; regular prophylaxis between attacks and is often effective in aborting an attack when taken at the first sign of articular discomfort; colchicine IV is used when rapid response is desired or if GI side effects interefere with oral use. Familial Mediterranean fever; hepatic cirrhosis; primary biliary cirrhosis; treatment of Behcet disease; scleroderma; Sweet syndrome

 

 Contraindications Serious GI, renal, hepatic, or cardiac disorders; blood dyscrasias.

 

 Route/Dosage

Acute Gouty Arthritis

Adults: Initial dose (give at first sign of attack) PO 1.2 mg; then 0.6 q hr or 1.2 mg q 2 hr until pain is relieved or diarrhea ensues. Total dose is usually 4 to 8 mg. Wait 3 days before initiating a second course of therapy. IV Initial dose 2 mg; then 0.5 mg q 6 hr until satisfactory response is achieved (max, 4 mg/24 hr or 1 course of treatment).

Prophylaxis

Adults: PO 0.6 mg/day for 3 to 4 days/wk if fewer than 1 attack/yr; if more than 1 attack/yr, 0.6 mg/day. Severe cases may require 1.2 to 1.8 mg/day.

Prophylaxis or Maintenance of Recurrent or Chronic Gouty Arthritis

Adults: IV 0.5 to 1 mg 1 or 2 times/day; however, oral form is preferable, usually in conjunction with a uricosuric agent.

Surgical Patients

Adults: PO 0.6 mg tid for 3 days before and 3 days after surgery.

 

 Interactions None well documented.

Do not dilute with 5% Dextrose in water.

 

 Lab Test Interferences May cause false-positive results in urine tests for RBCs and hemoglobin.

 

 Adverse Reactions

DERMATOLOGIC: Dermatoses; purpura; alopecia. GI: Nausea; vomiting; diarrhea; abdominal pain. HEMATOLOGIC: Bone marrow depression with aplastic anemia; agranulocytosis, leukopenia or thrombocytopenia (long-term therapy). HEPATIC: Elevated alkaline phosphatase and AST. OTHER: Reversible azoospermia; myopathy; peripheral neuritis.

 

 Precautions

Pregnancy: Category C (oral). Category D (parenteral). Lactation: Undetermined. CHILDREN: Safety and efficacy not established. Elderly: Administer with great caution to elderly and debilitated patients. Hepatic function impairment: Increased colchicine toxicity may occur. GI effects: Drug may cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain that may aggravate pre-existing peptic ulcer or spastic colon. Discontinue drug if these symptoms appear. Injection: Severe local irritation occurs if drug is given by SC or IM route. Myopathy and neuropathy: Myoneuropathy may occur and cause weakness in patients with impaired kidney function; serum creatine kinase may be elevated. Usually resolves in 3 to 4 wk after drug withdrawal. Vitamin B12 malabsorption: Colchicine induces reversible malabsorption of vitamin B12 with long-term use.

PATIENT CARE CONSIDERATIONS


 

 Administration/Storage

Parenteral

  • Reconstitute with 0.9% Sodium Chloride (without preservatives) only.
  • Administer parenterally via IV route only. Considerable irritation and tissue damage may occur if leakage into surrounding tissue occurs.

Oral

  • Store tablets in airtight, light-resistant container.

 

 Assessment/Interventions

  • Obtain patient history, including drug history and any known allergies.
  • Monitor serum uric acid and creatinine throughout therapy.
  • Check blood counts periodically in patients undergoing long-term therapy.
  • Monitor for phlebitis and extravasation.
  • Assess for signs of toxicity (eg, abdominal pain, alopecia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, myopathy, peripheral neuritis). Notify health care provider immediately if these signs occur.
  • Assess for signs of vitamin B12 deficiency (eg, anemia, paresis of extremities).
OVERDOSAGE: SIGNS & SYMPTOMS
  Nausea, severe abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, shock, ST segment elevation, paralysis, respiratory failure, liver damage, renal failure, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, alopecia, stomatitis

 

 Patient/Family Education

  • Instruct patient to take colchicine regularly to prevent acute attacks.
  • Instruct patient not to exceed 8 mg in course of therapy for acute attack. To minimize cumulative toxicity, patient should wait 3 days before starting second course.
  • Advise patient with gout to drink at least 2000 mL of fluid daily, unless contraindicated.
  • Reinforce health care provider’s instructions about weight loss, diet, and alcohol intake.
  • Advise patient to have extra supply of drug on hand in case health care provider gives instructions to increase dosage.
  • Instruct patient to stop taking drug if nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or abdominal pain occurs, especially if patient has history of spastic colon or ulcers.

Drug Side Effects ::

(KOHL-chih-seen)
Colchicine
Tablets: 0.6 mg
Injection: 0.5 mg/mL
Class: Analgesic, Gout

 

 Action Inhibits inflammation and reduces pain and swelling associated with gouty arthritis.

 

 Indications Treatment and relief of pain in attacks of acute gouty arthritis; regular prophylaxis between attacks and is often effective in aborting an attack when taken at the first sign of articular discomfort; colchicine IV is used when rapid response is desired or if GI side effects interefere with oral use. Familial Mediterranean fever; hepatic cirrhosis; primary biliary cirrhosis; treatment of Behcet disease; scleroderma; Sweet syndrome

 

 Contraindications Serious GI, renal, hepatic, or cardiac disorders; blood dyscrasias.

 

 Route/Dosage

Acute Gouty Arthritis

Adults: Initial dose (give at first sign of attack) PO 1.2 mg; then 0.6 q hr or 1.2 mg q 2 hr until pain is relieved or diarrhea ensues. Total dose is usually 4 to 8 mg. Wait 3 days before initiating a second course of therapy. IV Initial dose 2 mg; then 0.5 mg q 6 hr until satisfactory response is achieved (max, 4 mg/24 hr or 1 course of treatment).

Prophylaxis

Adults: PO 0.6 mg/day for 3 to 4 days/wk if fewer than 1 attack/yr; if more than 1 attack/yr, 0.6 mg/day. Severe cases may require 1.2 to 1.8 mg/day.

Prophylaxis or Maintenance of Recurrent or Chronic Gouty Arthritis

Adults: IV 0.5 to 1 mg 1 or 2 times/day; however, oral form is preferable, usually in conjunction with a uricosuric agent.

Surgical Patients

Adults: PO 0.6 mg tid for 3 days before and 3 days after surgery.

 

 Interactions None well documented.

Do not dilute with 5% Dextrose in water.

 

 Lab Test Interferences May cause false-positive results in urine tests for RBCs and hemoglobin.

 

 Adverse Reactions

DERMATOLOGIC: Dermatoses; purpura; alopecia. GI: Nausea; vomiting; diarrhea; abdominal pain. HEMATOLOGIC: Bone marrow depression with aplastic anemia; agranulocytosis, leukopenia or thrombocytopenia (long-term therapy). HEPATIC: Elevated alkaline phosphatase and AST. OTHER: Reversible azoospermia; myopathy; peripheral neuritis.

 

 Precautions

Pregnancy: Category C (oral). Category D (parenteral). Lactation: Undetermined. CHILDREN: Safety and efficacy not established. Elderly: Administer with great caution to elderly and debilitated patients. Hepatic function impairment: Increased colchicine toxicity may occur. GI effects: Drug may cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain that may aggravate pre-existing peptic ulcer or spastic colon. Discontinue drug if these symptoms appear. Injection: Severe local irritation occurs if drug is given by SC or IM route. Myopathy and neuropathy: Myoneuropathy may occur and cause weakness in patients with impaired kidney function; serum creatine kinase may be elevated. Usually resolves in 3 to 4 wk after drug withdrawal. Vitamin B12 malabsorption: Colchicine induces reversible malabsorption of vitamin B12 with long-term use.

PATIENT CARE CONSIDERATIONS


 

 Administration/Storage

Parenteral

  • Reconstitute with 0.9% Sodium Chloride (without preservatives) only.
  • Administer parenterally via IV route only. Considerable irritation and tissue damage may occur if leakage into surrounding tissue occurs.

Oral

  • Store tablets in airtight, light-resistant container.

 

 Assessment/Interventions

  • Obtain patient history, including drug history and any known allergies.
  • Monitor serum uric acid and creatinine throughout therapy.
  • Check blood counts periodically in patients undergoing long-term therapy.
  • Monitor for phlebitis and extravasation.
  • Assess for signs of toxicity (eg, abdominal pain, alopecia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, myopathy, peripheral neuritis). Notify health care provider immediately if these signs occur.
  • Assess for signs of vitamin B12 deficiency (eg, anemia, paresis of extremities).
OVERDOSAGE: SIGNS & SYMPTOMS
  Nausea, severe abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, shock, ST segment elevation, paralysis, respiratory failure, liver damage, renal failure, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, alopecia, stomatitis

 

 Patient/Family Education

  • Instruct patient to take colchicine regularly to prevent acute attacks.
  • Instruct patient not to exceed 8 mg in course of therapy for acute attack. To minimize cumulative toxicity, patient should wait 3 days before starting second course.
  • Advise patient with gout to drink at least 2000 mL of fluid daily, unless contraindicated.
  • Reinforce health care provider’s instructions about weight loss, diet, and alcohol intake.
  • Advise patient to have extra supply of drug on hand in case health care provider gives instructions to increase dosage.
  • Instruct patient to stop taking drug if nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or abdominal pain occurs, especially if patient has history of spastic colon or ulcers.

Drug Mode of Action ::  

(KOHL-chih-seen)
Colchicine
Tablets: 0.6 mg
Injection: 0.5 mg/mL
Class: Analgesic, Gout

 

 Action Inhibits inflammation and reduces pain and swelling associated with gouty arthritis.

 

 Indications Treatment and relief of pain in attacks of acute gouty arthritis; regular prophylaxis between attacks and is often effective in aborting an attack when taken at the first sign of articular discomfort; colchicine IV is used when rapid response is desired or if GI side effects interefere with oral use. Familial Mediterranean fever; hepatic cirrhosis; primary biliary cirrhosis; treatment of Behcet disease; scleroderma; Sweet syndrome

 

 Contraindications Serious GI, renal, hepatic, or cardiac disorders; blood dyscrasias.

 

 Route/Dosage

Acute Gouty Arthritis

Adults: Initial dose (give at first sign of attack) PO 1.2 mg; then 0.6 q hr or 1.2 mg q 2 hr until pain is relieved or diarrhea ensues. Total dose is usually 4 to 8 mg. Wait 3 days before initiating a second course of therapy. IV Initial dose 2 mg; then 0.5 mg q 6 hr until satisfactory response is achieved (max, 4 mg/24 hr or 1 course of treatment).

Prophylaxis

Adults: PO 0.6 mg/day for 3 to 4 days/wk if fewer than 1 attack/yr; if more than 1 attack/yr, 0.6 mg/day. Severe cases may require 1.2 to 1.8 mg/day.

Prophylaxis or Maintenance of Recurrent or Chronic Gouty Arthritis

Adults: IV 0.5 to 1 mg 1 or 2 times/day; however, oral form is preferable, usually in conjunction with a uricosuric agent.

Surgical Patients

Adults: PO 0.6 mg tid for 3 days before and 3 days after surgery.

 

 Interactions None well documented.

Do not dilute with 5% Dextrose in water.

 

 Lab Test Interferences May cause false-positive results in urine tests for RBCs and hemoglobin.

 

 Adverse Reactions

DERMATOLOGIC: Dermatoses; purpura; alopecia. GI: Nausea; vomiting; diarrhea; abdominal pain. HEMATOLOGIC: Bone marrow depression with aplastic anemia; agranulocytosis, leukopenia or thrombocytopenia (long-term therapy). HEPATIC: Elevated alkaline phosphatase and AST. OTHER: Reversible azoospermia; myopathy; peripheral neuritis.

 

 Precautions

Pregnancy: Category C (oral). Category D (parenteral). Lactation: Undetermined. CHILDREN: Safety and efficacy not established. Elderly: Administer with great caution to elderly and debilitated patients. Hepatic function impairment: Increased colchicine toxicity may occur. GI effects: Drug may cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain that may aggravate pre-existing peptic ulcer or spastic colon. Discontinue drug if these symptoms appear. Injection: Severe local irritation occurs if drug is given by SC or IM route. Myopathy and neuropathy: Myoneuropathy may occur and cause weakness in patients with impaired kidney function; serum creatine kinase may be elevated. Usually resolves in 3 to 4 wk after drug withdrawal. Vitamin B12 malabsorption: Colchicine induces reversible malabsorption of vitamin B12 with long-term use.

PATIENT CARE CONSIDERATIONS


 

 Administration/Storage

Parenteral

  • Reconstitute with 0.9% Sodium Chloride (without preservatives) only.
  • Administer parenterally via IV route only. Considerable irritation and tissue damage may occur if leakage into surrounding tissue occurs.

Oral

  • Store tablets in airtight, light-resistant container.

 

 Assessment/Interventions

  • Obtain patient history, including drug history and any known allergies.
  • Monitor serum uric acid and creatinine throughout therapy.
  • Check blood counts periodically in patients undergoing long-term therapy.
  • Monitor for phlebitis and extravasation.
  • Assess for signs of toxicity (eg, abdominal pain, alopecia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, myopathy, peripheral neuritis). Notify health care provider immediately if these signs occur.
  • Assess for signs of vitamin B12 deficiency (eg, anemia, paresis of extremities).
OVERDOSAGE: SIGNS & SYMPTOMS
  Nausea, severe abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, shock, ST segment elevation, paralysis, respiratory failure, liver damage, renal failure, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, alopecia, stomatitis

 

 Patient/Family Education

  • Instruct patient to take colchicine regularly to prevent acute attacks.
  • Instruct patient not to exceed 8 mg in course of therapy for acute attack. To minimize cumulative toxicity, patient should wait 3 days before starting second course.
  • Advise patient with gout to drink at least 2000 mL of fluid daily, unless contraindicated.
  • Reinforce health care provider’s instructions about weight loss, diet, and alcohol intake.
  • Advise patient to have extra supply of drug on hand in case health care provider gives instructions to increase dosage.
  • Instruct patient to stop taking drug if nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or abdominal pain occurs, especially if patient has history of spastic colon or ulcers.

Drug Interactions ::

(KOHL-chih-seen)
Colchicine
Tablets: 0.6 mg
Injection: 0.5 mg/mL
Class: Analgesic, Gout

 

 Action Inhibits inflammation and reduces pain and swelling associated with gouty arthritis.

 

 Indications Treatment and relief of pain in attacks of acute gouty arthritis; regular prophylaxis between attacks and is often effective in aborting an attack when taken at the first sign of articular discomfort; colchicine IV is used when rapid response is desired or if GI side effects interefere with oral use. Familial Mediterranean fever; hepatic cirrhosis; primary biliary cirrhosis; treatment of Behcet disease; scleroderma; Sweet syndrome

 

 Contraindications Serious GI, renal, hepatic, or cardiac disorders; blood dyscrasias.

 

 Route/Dosage

Acute Gouty Arthritis

Adults: Initial dose (give at first sign of attack) PO 1.2 mg; then 0.6 q hr or 1.2 mg q 2 hr until pain is relieved or diarrhea ensues. Total dose is usually 4 to 8 mg. Wait 3 days before initiating a second course of therapy. IV Initial dose 2 mg; then 0.5 mg q 6 hr until satisfactory response is achieved (max, 4 mg/24 hr or 1 course of treatment).

Prophylaxis

Adults: PO 0.6 mg/day for 3 to 4 days/wk if fewer than 1 attack/yr; if more than 1 attack/yr, 0.6 mg/day. Severe cases may require 1.2 to 1.8 mg/day.

Prophylaxis or Maintenance of Recurrent or Chronic Gouty Arthritis

Adults: IV 0.5 to 1 mg 1 or 2 times/day; however, oral form is preferable, usually in conjunction with a uricosuric agent.

Surgical Patients

Adults: PO 0.6 mg tid for 3 days before and 3 days after surgery.

 

 Interactions None well documented.

Do not dilute with 5% Dextrose in water.

 

Drug Assesment ::

(KOHL-chih-seen)
Colchicine
Tablets: 0.6 mg
Injection: 0.5 mg/mL
Class: Analgesic, Gout

 

 Action Inhibits inflammation and reduces pain and swelling associated with gouty arthritis.

 

 Indications Treatment and relief of pain in attacks of acute gouty arthritis; regular prophylaxis between attacks and is often effective in aborting an attack when taken at the first sign of articular discomfort; colchicine IV is used when rapid response is desired or if GI side effects interefere with oral use. Familial Mediterranean fever; hepatic cirrhosis; primary biliary cirrhosis; treatment of Behcet disease; scleroderma; Sweet syndrome

 

 Contraindications Serious GI, renal, hepatic, or cardiac disorders; blood dyscrasias.

 

 Route/Dosage

Acute Gouty Arthritis

Adults: Initial dose (give at first sign of attack) PO 1.2 mg; then 0.6 q hr or 1.2 mg q 2 hr until pain is relieved or diarrhea ensues. Total dose is usually 4 to 8 mg. Wait 3 days before initiating a second course of therapy. IV Initial dose 2 mg; then 0.5 mg q 6 hr until satisfactory response is achieved (max, 4 mg/24 hr or 1 course of treatment).

Prophylaxis

Adults: PO 0.6 mg/day for 3 to 4 days/wk if fewer than 1 attack/yr; if more than 1 attack/yr, 0.6 mg/day. Severe cases may require 1.2 to 1.8 mg/day.

Prophylaxis or Maintenance of Recurrent or Chronic Gouty Arthritis

Adults: IV 0.5 to 1 mg 1 or 2 times/day; however, oral form is preferable, usually in conjunction with a uricosuric agent.

Surgical Patients

Adults: PO 0.6 mg tid for 3 days before and 3 days after surgery.

 

 Interactions None well documented.

Do not dilute with 5% Dextrose in water.

 

 Lab Test Interferences May cause false-positive results in urine tests for RBCs and hemoglobin.

 

 Adverse Reactions

DERMATOLOGIC: Dermatoses; purpura; alopecia. GI: Nausea; vomiting; diarrhea; abdominal pain. HEMATOLOGIC: Bone marrow depression with aplastic anemia; agranulocytosis, leukopenia or thrombocytopenia (long-term therapy). HEPATIC: Elevated alkaline phosphatase and AST. OTHER: Reversible azoospermia; myopathy; peripheral neuritis.

 

 Precautions

Pregnancy: Category C (oral). Category D (parenteral). Lactation: Undetermined. CHILDREN: Safety and efficacy not established. Elderly: Administer with great caution to elderly and debilitated patients. Hepatic function impairment: Increased colchicine toxicity may occur. GI effects: Drug may cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain that may aggravate pre-existing peptic ulcer or spastic colon. Discontinue drug if these symptoms appear. Injection: Severe local irritation occurs if drug is given by SC or IM route. Myopathy and neuropathy: Myoneuropathy may occur and cause weakness in patients with impaired kidney function; serum creatine kinase may be elevated. Usually resolves in 3 to 4 wk after drug withdrawal. Vitamin B12 malabsorption: Colchicine induces reversible malabsorption of vitamin B12 with long-term use.

PATIENT CARE CONSIDERATIONS


 

 Administration/Storage

Parenteral

  • Reconstitute with 0.9% Sodium Chloride (without preservatives) only.
  • Administer parenterally via IV route only. Considerable irritation and tissue damage may occur if leakage into surrounding tissue occurs.

Oral

  • Store tablets in airtight, light-resistant container.

 

 Assessment/Interventions

  • Obtain patient history, including drug history and any known allergies.
  • Monitor serum uric acid and creatinine throughout therapy.
  • Check blood counts periodically in patients undergoing long-term therapy.
  • Monitor for phlebitis and extravasation.
  • Assess for signs of toxicity (eg, abdominal pain, alopecia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, myopathy, peripheral neuritis). Notify health care provider immediately if these signs occur.
  • Assess for signs of vitamin B12 deficiency (eg, anemia, paresis of extremities).
OVERDOSAGE: SIGNS & SYMPTOMS
  Nausea, severe abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, shock, ST segment elevation, paralysis, respiratory failure, liver damage, renal failure, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, alopecia, stomatitis

 

 Patient/Family Education

  • Instruct patient to take colchicine regularly to prevent acute attacks.
  • Instruct patient not to exceed 8 mg in course of therapy for acute attack. To minimize cumulative toxicity, patient should wait 3 days before starting second course.
  • Advise patient with gout to drink at least 2000 mL of fluid daily, unless contraindicated.
  • Reinforce health care provider’s instructions about weight loss, diet, and alcohol intake.
  • Advise patient to have extra supply of drug on hand in case health care provider gives instructions to increase dosage.
  • Instruct patient to stop taking drug if nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or abdominal pain occurs, especially if patient has history of spastic colon or ulcers.

Drug Storage/Management ::

(KOHL-chih-seen)
Colchicine
Tablets: 0.6 mg
Injection: 0.5 mg/mL
Class: Analgesic, Gout

 

 Action Inhibits inflammation and reduces pain and swelling associated with gouty arthritis.

 

 Indications Treatment and relief of pain in attacks of acute gouty arthritis; regular prophylaxis between attacks and is often effective in aborting an attack when taken at the first sign of articular discomfort; colchicine IV is used when rapid response is desired or if GI side effects interefere with oral use. Familial Mediterranean fever; hepatic cirrhosis; primary biliary cirrhosis; treatment of Behcet disease; scleroderma; Sweet syndrome

 

 Contraindications Serious GI, renal, hepatic, or cardiac disorders; blood dyscrasias.

 

 Route/Dosage

Acute Gouty Arthritis

Adults: Initial dose (give at first sign of attack) PO 1.2 mg; then 0.6 q hr or 1.2 mg q 2 hr until pain is relieved or diarrhea ensues. Total dose is usually 4 to 8 mg. Wait 3 days before initiating a second course of therapy. IV Initial dose 2 mg; then 0.5 mg q 6 hr until satisfactory response is achieved (max, 4 mg/24 hr or 1 course of treatment).

Prophylaxis

Adults: PO 0.6 mg/day for 3 to 4 days/wk if fewer than 1 attack/yr; if more than 1 attack/yr, 0.6 mg/day. Severe cases may require 1.2 to 1.8 mg/day.

Prophylaxis or Maintenance of Recurrent or Chronic Gouty Arthritis

Adults: IV 0.5 to 1 mg 1 or 2 times/day; however, oral form is preferable, usually in conjunction with a uricosuric agent.

Surgical Patients

Adults: PO 0.6 mg tid for 3 days before and 3 days after surgery.

 

 Interactions None well documented.

Do not dilute with 5% Dextrose in water.

 

 Lab Test Interferences May cause false-positive results in urine tests for RBCs and hemoglobin.

 

 Adverse Reactions

DERMATOLOGIC: Dermatoses; purpura; alopecia. GI: Nausea; vomiting; diarrhea; abdominal pain. HEMATOLOGIC: Bone marrow depression with aplastic anemia; agranulocytosis, leukopenia or thrombocytopenia (long-term therapy). HEPATIC: Elevated alkaline phosphatase and AST. OTHER: Reversible azoospermia; myopathy; peripheral neuritis.

 

 Precautions

Pregnancy: Category C (oral). Category D (parenteral). Lactation: Undetermined. CHILDREN: Safety and efficacy not established. Elderly: Administer with great caution to elderly and debilitated patients. Hepatic function impairment: Increased colchicine toxicity may occur. GI effects: Drug may cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain that may aggravate pre-existing peptic ulcer or spastic colon. Discontinue drug if these symptoms appear. Injection: Severe local irritation occurs if drug is given by SC or IM route. Myopathy and neuropathy: Myoneuropathy may occur and cause weakness in patients with impaired kidney function; serum creatine kinase may be elevated. Usually resolves in 3 to 4 wk after drug withdrawal. Vitamin B12 malabsorption: Colchicine induces reversible malabsorption of vitamin B12 with long-term use.

PATIENT CARE CONSIDERATIONS


 

 Administration/Storage

Parenteral

  • Reconstitute with 0.9% Sodium Chloride (without preservatives) only.
  • Administer parenterally via IV route only. Considerable irritation and tissue damage may occur if leakage into surrounding tissue occurs.

Oral

  • Store tablets in airtight, light-resistant container.

 

 Assessment/Interventions

  • Obtain patient history, including drug history and any known allergies.
  • Monitor serum uric acid and creatinine throughout therapy.
  • Check blood counts periodically in patients undergoing long-term therapy.
  • Monitor for phlebitis and extravasation.
  • Assess for signs of toxicity (eg, abdominal pain, alopecia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, myopathy, peripheral neuritis). Notify health care provider immediately if these signs occur.
  • Assess for signs of vitamin B12 deficiency (eg, anemia, paresis of extremities).
OVERDOSAGE: SIGNS & SYMPTOMS
  Nausea, severe abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, shock, ST segment elevation, paralysis, respiratory failure, liver damage, renal failure, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, alopecia, stomatitis

 

 Patient/Family Education

  • Instruct patient to take colchicine regularly to prevent acute attacks.
  • Instruct patient not to exceed 8 mg in course of therapy for acute attack. To minimize cumulative toxicity, patient should wait 3 days before starting second course.
  • Advise patient with gout to drink at least 2000 mL of fluid daily, unless contraindicated.
  • Reinforce health care provider’s instructions about weight loss, diet, and alcohol intake.
  • Advise patient to have extra supply of drug on hand in case health care provider gives instructions to increase dosage.
  • Instruct patient to stop taking drug if nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or abdominal pain occurs, especially if patient has history of spastic colon or ulcers.

Drug Notes ::

(KOHL-chih-seen)
Colchicine
Tablets: 0.6 mg
Injection: 0.5 mg/mL
Class: Analgesic, Gout

 

 Action Inhibits inflammation and reduces pain and swelling associated with gouty arthritis.

 

 Indications Treatment and relief of pain in attacks of acute gouty arthritis; regular prophylaxis between attacks and is often effective in aborting an attack when taken at the first sign of articular discomfort; colchicine IV is used when rapid response is desired or if GI side effects interefere with oral use. Familial Mediterranean fever; hepatic cirrhosis; primary biliary cirrhosis; treatment of Behcet disease; scleroderma; Sweet syndrome

 

 Contraindications Serious GI, renal, hepatic, or cardiac disorders; blood dyscrasias.

 

 Route/Dosage

Acute Gouty Arthritis

Adults: Initial dose (give at first sign of attack) PO 1.2 mg; then 0.6 q hr or 1.2 mg q 2 hr until pain is relieved or diarrhea ensues. Total dose is usually 4 to 8 mg. Wait 3 days before initiating a second course of therapy. IV Initial dose 2 mg; then 0.5 mg q 6 hr until satisfactory response is achieved (max, 4 mg/24 hr or 1 course of treatment).

Prophylaxis

Adults: PO 0.6 mg/day for 3 to 4 days/wk if fewer than 1 attack/yr; if more than 1 attack/yr, 0.6 mg/day. Severe cases may require 1.2 to 1.8 mg/day.

Prophylaxis or Maintenance of Recurrent or Chronic Gouty Arthritis

Adults: IV 0.5 to 1 mg 1 or 2 times/day; however, oral form is preferable, usually in conjunction with a uricosuric agent.

Surgical Patients

Adults: PO 0.6 mg tid for 3 days before and 3 days after surgery.

 

 Interactions None well documented.

Do not dilute with 5% Dextrose in water.

 

 Lab Test Interferences May cause false-positive results in urine tests for RBCs and hemoglobin.

 

 Adverse Reactions

DERMATOLOGIC: Dermatoses; purpura; alopecia. GI: Nausea; vomiting; diarrhea; abdominal pain. HEMATOLOGIC: Bone marrow depression with aplastic anemia; agranulocytosis, leukopenia or thrombocytopenia (long-term therapy). HEPATIC: Elevated alkaline phosphatase and AST. OTHER: Reversible azoospermia; myopathy; peripheral neuritis.

 

 Precautions

Pregnancy: Category C (oral). Category D (parenteral). Lactation: Undetermined. CHILDREN: Safety and efficacy not established. Elderly: Administer with great caution to elderly and debilitated patients. Hepatic function impairment: Increased colchicine toxicity may occur. GI effects: Drug may cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain that may aggravate pre-existing peptic ulcer or spastic colon. Discontinue drug if these symptoms appear. Injection: Severe local irritation occurs if drug is given by SC or IM route. Myopathy and neuropathy: Myoneuropathy may occur and cause weakness in patients with impaired kidney function; serum creatine kinase may be elevated. Usually resolves in 3 to 4 wk after drug withdrawal. Vitamin B12 malabsorption: Colchicine induces reversible malabsorption of vitamin B12 with long-term use.

PATIENT CARE CONSIDERATIONS


 

 Administration/Storage

Parenteral

  • Reconstitute with 0.9% Sodium Chloride (without preservatives) only.
  • Administer parenterally via IV route only. Considerable irritation and tissue damage may occur if leakage into surrounding tissue occurs.

Oral

  • Store tablets in airtight, light-resistant container.

 

 Assessment/Interventions

  • Obtain patient history, including drug history and any known allergies.
  • Monitor serum uric acid and creatinine throughout therapy.
  • Check blood counts periodically in patients undergoing long-term therapy.
  • Monitor for phlebitis and extravasation.
  • Assess for signs of toxicity (eg, abdominal pain, alopecia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, myopathy, peripheral neuritis). Notify health care provider immediately if these signs occur.
  • Assess for signs of vitamin B12 deficiency (eg, anemia, paresis of extremities).
OVERDOSAGE: SIGNS & SYMPTOMS
  Nausea, severe abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, shock, ST segment elevation, paralysis, respiratory failure, liver damage, renal failure, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, alopecia, stomatitis

 

 Patient/Family Education

  • Instruct patient to take colchicine regularly to prevent acute attacks.
  • Instruct patient not to exceed 8 mg in course of therapy for acute attack. To minimize cumulative toxicity, patient should wait 3 days before starting second course.
  • Advise patient with gout to drink at least 2000 mL of fluid daily, unless contraindicated.
  • Reinforce health care provider’s instructions about weight loss, diet, and alcohol intake.
  • Advise patient to have extra supply of drug on hand in case health care provider gives instructions to increase dosage.
  • Instruct patient to stop taking drug if nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or abdominal pain occurs, especially if patient has history of spastic colon or ulcers.

Disclaimer ::

The Information available on this site is for only Informational Purpose , before any use of this information please consult your Doctor .Price of the drugs indicated above may not match to real price due to many possible reasons may , including local taxes etc.. These are only approximate indicative prices of the drug.

We would like to keep you updated with special notifications.