Details About Generic Salt ::  Thiamine

Main Medicine Class:: Vitamin   

(THIGH-uh-min HIGH-droe-KLOR-ide)
Thiamilate,  Betaxin
Class: Vitamin

 

Drugs Class ::

 Action Thiamine, after conversion to thiamine pyrophosphate, functions with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in carbohydrate metabolism. Deficiencies result in beriberi, characterized by GI manifestations, peripheral neuropathy and cerebral deficits.

Indications for Drugs ::

 Indications Prophylaxis or treatment of thiamine deficiency (beriberi). Parenteral use indicated when oral therapy not feasible or advisable. Unlabeled use(s): Mosquito repellant; treatment of ulcerative colitis, chronic diarrhea, cerebellar syndrome, polyneuritis; appetite stimulant; prevention of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

Drug Dose ::

 Route/Dosage

ADULTS: PO 0.5 mg/1000 kcal intake. RDA is 1.2–1.5 mg (adult males), 1 to 1.1 mg (adult females) 1.2 mg (CHILDREN 6–10 YR), 0.8–1 mg (CHILDREN < 6 YR), and 0.3–0.5 mg (infants).

Wet Beriberi with Myocardial Failure

ADULTS: IV 10–30 mg tid. Treat as emergency cardiac condition.

Beriberi

ADULTS: IM 10–20 mg tid for 2 wk, then PO 5–10 mg (as part of multivitamin) for 1 mo. CHILDREN: IV 10 mg initially followed by IM 10 mg bid for 3 days, then 10 mg daily for 6 wk.

Thiamine Deficiency Secondary to Alcoholism (Wernicke’s Encephalopathy)

ADULTS: IV 50–100 mg; then IM/IV 50–100 mg/day until consuming normal diet; then PO 40 mg/day.

Metabolic Disorders

ADULTS: PO 10–20 mg daily; maximum doses of 4 g daily have been used.

Contraindication ::

 Contraindications Standard considerations.

Drug Precautions ::

 Precautions

Pregnancy: Category A. (Category C if used in doses greater than the RDA.) Lactation: Undetermined. Hypersensitivity: Can occur. Deaths have resulted from IV administration. Intradermal test dose is recommended if sensitivity is suspected. Deficiency: Single vitamin B1 deficiency is rare; suspect multiple vitamin deficiencies. Wernicke’s encephalopathy: May occur or worsen suddenly in thiamine-deficient patients given glucose. If deficiency is suspected, give thiamine before or with dextrose-containing fluids.

PATIENT CARE CONSIDERATIONS


Drug Side Effects ::

 Adverse Reactions

CV: Cardiovascular collapse; hypotension; death. CNS: Weakness; restlessness. DERM: Pruritus; urticaria. EENT: Tightness of throat. GI: Nausea; hemorrhage into GI tract. RESP: Pulmonary edema; cyanosis. OTHER: Feeling of warmth; sweating; anaphylaxis; angioneurotic edema; local tenderness and induration (after IM use).

Drug Mode of Action ::  

 Action Thiamine, after conversion to thiamine pyrophosphate, functions with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in carbohydrate metabolism. Deficiencies result in beriberi, characterized by GI manifestations, peripheral neuropathy and cerebral deficits.

Drug Interactions ::

 Interactions

IV incompatibilities: Unstable in neutral or alkaline solutions. Incompatible with sulfite containing solutions. Incompatible with barbiturates, erythromycin, lactobionate, citrates.

Drug Assesment ::

 Assessment/Interventions

  • Obtain patient history, including drug history and any known allergies.
  • Give intradermal test dose first if hypersensitivity is suspected.
  • Assess the patient for other nutritional deficiencies, since single vitamin deficiencies are rare.
  • Administer thiamine before giving IV solutions containing glucose as glucose administration may cause sudden worsening of Wernicke’s encephalopathy.
  • Monitor for adverse reactions and notify physician of signs of weakness, restlessness, cardiovascular collapse, pulmonary edema, throat tightness, nausea, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, pruritus, urticaria, feeling of warmth, diaphoresis, cyanosis, angioneurotic edema.

Drug Storage/Management ::

 Administration/Storage

  • As a nutritional supplement, calculate dosage based on standard dose of 0.5 mg/1000 kcal daily intake.
  • For IV infusion, give at rate of £ 100 mg/³ 5 min.
  • For IM injection, rotate injection sites if pain and inflammation occur. Administer via Z-track method to minimize pain. Application of cold may decrease pain.
  • Store in light-resistant container.

Drug Notes ::

 Patient/Family Education

  • Alert patient to potential lab test abnormalities.
  • Inform patient of all potential adverse reactions and of importance of reporting problems to physician.
  • Teach patient about proper nutritional balance needed in diet. Thiamine-rich foods are yeast, beef, liver, legumes, beans and whole grains.

Disclaimer ::

The Information available on this site is for only Informational Purpose , before any use of this information please consult your Doctor .Price of the drugs indicated above may not match to real price due to many possible reasons may , including local taxes etc.. These are only approximate indicative prices of the drug.

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